Cerca tra oltre 100 milioni di oggetti venduti nel nostro database dei prezzi

[ TRIBAL - NATIVE AMERICAN ] EARLY DELAWARE BANDOLIER BAG, thread-
Venduto

Descrizione dell'oggetto

[ TRIBAL - NATIVE AMERICAN ] EARLY DELAWARE BANDOLIER BAG, thread- sewn and designed with small (13/0) corn yellow, red white-heart, maroon, periwinkle, shades of white, translucent green, amber, and blue glass cut beads. Shoulder strap is composed of a brown-green wool trade blanket with central black stripe. The strap's beadwork is asymmetrical with elements of stars and hooked-tip crosses along one side and floral and paisley devices on opposite. The strap is edged with red satin and dotted with parallel rows of white beads, ultimately having a tripartite finish. The pouch is composed of blue wool and lined with mattress ticking. Beadwork forms open diamonds along the edge and is underscored by a row of tin cones filled with tufts of red wool. The motif continues along the lower portion of the bag where five rows of multicolored diamonds lock together. The pouch is also edged with red satin, which is offset by a single strand of white beads. A single remnant tin cone with red wool tuft hangs at bottom of bag, total length 35' x width of pouch 9.5'. The Delaware, or Lenape, an Algonquin-speaking people, have found themselves endlessly relocating and in continuous conflict between Europeans and other American Indian tribes throughout the United State's formative years. Originally settled along the Susquehanna, due to Iroquoian insults, disease, and incessant conflicts with the French, British, and Americans, after 1740, the Delaware joined the Shawnee and occupied portions of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Indiana. By the 1820s, and after several 'minor' relocations, many of Delaware moved to Missouri. Unfortunately, the Osage who were already living in the area, viewed the Delaware as intruders attempting to steal their already scarce food supply. War broke out between the two, ultimately ending in governmental intervention. This group of Delaware and the remaining Ohio Delaware then moved across the Missouri River and into Kansas between 1829 and 1832. During this transitional period of 1830 1840, Delaware women were intimately exposed to the artistic influence of the Cherokee, Creek, and other southeastern groups. Yet, the Delaware identity and survival of earlier features have been retained in this bag hallmarked by the shape of the pouch and shoulder strap, the composition of design elements, retention of red tassels and tin cones, and the lack of a pouch flap. Bags such as this served as prestigious badges of ethnic identity and were worn by men at formal and festive occasions. This bag was purchased by the consignor at an estate auction in Clinton County, Ohio, but was presumably was made in Kansas Territory between 1830 and 1840. Similar examples can be found at the Peabody Museum at Harvard University which was acquired in Kansas in 1838 (Cat. nr. 23541), and at the National Museum of the American Indian (Cat. nr. 10/972101). Cowan's gratefully acknowledges the assistance of Dr. Ted Brasseur in preparing this catalogue entry. His comments (May 2005) are incorporated here.
US
IL, US
US

*Nota: il prezzo non corrisponde al valore odierno, ma si riferisce soltanto al reale prezzo di aggiudicazione al momento dell'acquisto.

*Nota: il prezzo non corrisponde al valore odierno, ma si riferisce soltanto al reale prezzo di aggiudicazione al momento dell'acquisto.