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The Drake Family Carved and Painted Joined Chest with Drawer
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The Drake Family Carved and Painted Joined Chest with DrawerAttributed to the Deacon John Moore (1614-1677) Shop Tradition, Foliated Vine GroupWindsor, Connecticut, circa 1675-1690This joined chest is a masterpiece and very rare survival of its form. With its extensively carved surface, oak lid, sides double paneled over a single panel, and back finished with three panels and finished moldings on all four sides, it is the most elaborate and fully developed American Colonial three-panel chest known. It has survived in remarkable condition, retaining its original surface and much of its original painted decoration.This chest was possibly originally owned by John (1622-1688) and Hannah (Moore) Drake (1633-1686), of Windsor (later Simsbury), Connecticut. It might also have been a wedding gift for their son, Enoch Drake (1655-1698), who married Sarah Porter (1655-1730) on November 11, 1680. This chest descended to Enoch and Sarah Drake's son, Enoch (1683-1776) and his wife Elizabeth (1685-1717) and next to their daughter, Elizabeth (1707-1802), who married John Gillett (1707-1808). It continued through successive generations of the Gillett, Ward and Riddle branches of their family directly to the current owners.Although John Drake was himself a woodworker from the Drake family tradition in Windsor, this chest is believed to be the work of Hannah (Moore) Drake's brother, Deacon John Moore (1614-1677), a pioneer and settler of Windsor who established a multi-generational family woodworking tradition. In 1630, he emigrated from England with his father Thomas Moore (1584-1645), along with three puritan ministers -- the Reverends John White, John Warham and John Maverick - and other congregants to establish a religious community in Dorchester, Massachusetts. In 1635, they relocated their community to land north of Hartford on the banks of the Connecticut River, which they named Windsor, after Windsor, Berkshire, England. Deacon Moore was very active in Windsor, serving as Deacon of the First Congregational Church as well as selectman from 1653 to 1674. He was also responsible for building the school house and the meeting house, among other town contracts, for which he was paid in land grants. He secured land on the West side of Windsor (now Simsbury), for his sister Hannah and brother-in-law John Drake.This chest is part of Deacon Moore's foliated vine group, so named for the distinctive ornamentation consisting of symmetrical patterns of floral motifs and vines. Approximately 30 boxes are known that stem from this group as well as a table at the Connecticut Historical Society and two joined chests. One of the aforementioned chests in a private collection displays a four panel front. The other example in the collection of Old Sturbridge Village from the Moore shop was possibly made by Nathaniel Gaylord (1656-1720), who was trained in the craft tradition. The present chest and the Old Sturbridge Village example are very similar in their three paneled form and foliate ornamentation, although this one is more elaborately carved and paneled in addition to being finished on the back. For additional information on Deacon John Moore and his work, see Joshua W. Lane and Donald P. White III, ""Fashioning Furniture and Framing Community: Woodworkers and the Rise of a Connecticut River Valley Town,"" American Furniture 2005, edited by Luke Beckerdite, pp. 178-188. See Joshua W. Lane and Donald P. White III, Woodworkers of Windsor, Deerfield, 2003, figs. 1-4, pp. 14-9. See Gerald Ward and William Hosley, eds., The Great River, Art & Society of the Connecticut River Valley, 1635-1820, Hartford, 1985, p. 201, no. 80. h. 31 in., w. 50 in., d. 20 in.h. 31 in.; w. 50 in.; d. 20 ? in.h. 31 in.; l. 50 in.; d. 20 in.
US
NY, US
US

*Nota: il prezzo non corrisponde al valore odierno, ma si riferisce soltanto al reale prezzo di aggiudicazione al momento dell'acquisto.

*Nota: il prezzo non corrisponde al valore odierno, ma si riferisce soltanto al reale prezzo di aggiudicazione al momento dell'acquisto.

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