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Rabbit
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Rabbit
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Rabbit

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Descrizione dell'oggetto

Jeff Koons (b. 1955)\n\nRabbit\n\nstainless steel\n\n41 x 19 x 12 in. (104.1 x 48.3 x 30.5 cm.)\n\nExecuted in 1986. This work is number two from an edition of three plus one artist's proof and is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.
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notes

Jeff Koons: A Masterpiece from the Collection of S.I. Newhouse

Since its creation in 1986, Jeff Koons’s Rabbit has become one of the most iconic works of 20th-century art. Standing at just over three feet tall, this shiny steel sculpture is at once inviting and imposing. Rabbit melds a Minimalist sheen with a naïve sense of play. It is crisp and cool in its appearance, yet taps into the visual language of childhood, of all that is pure and innocent. Its lack of facial features renders it wholly inscrutable, but the forms themselves evoke fun and frivolity, an effect heightened by the crimps and dimples that have been translated into the stainless steel from which it has been made. Few works of art of its generation can have the same instant recognizability: it has been on the cover of numerous books, exhibition catalogues and magazines; a monumental blow-up version even featured in the 2007 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. For an artist such as Koons, who is so focused on widening the sphere in which art operates and communicates, Rabbit is the ultimate case in point.

Despite its endemic presence in our cultural fabric, Rabbit is also an exceedingly rare object. The sculpture was cast in 1986 in an edition of three, plus an artist’s proof. In addition to this example, one is now in The Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles, another in the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and a third in the National Museum of Qatar. Thus, the present example is the only one left in private hands, and while other examples have been exhibited extensively, this example of Rabbit has not been exhibited in public since the 1988 group show, Schlaf der Vernunft, or The Sleep of Reason, at the Museum Fredericianum in Kassel.

Looking at Rabbit, the precision for which Koons has since become so renowned is there in all its seductive glory. The steel surface of the titular bunny initially appears smooth and balloon-like, the forms reduced to some abstract, Platonic ideal. They nonetheless introduce complex plays of form, with the narrow carrot serving as a counterpoint to the rounded torso and face. Adding a dynamism to the composition, the tentatively-hovering carrot, perching at the edge of the spherical head also ensures that there is a tension to the work. It hints at penetration, at bursting the balloon, and at that most Koonsian of subjects: sex. The dynamism of Rabbit is reinforced by the fact that, on closer inspection, this sculpture has been rendered with an incredibly meticulous attention to detail. Be it in the corrugations that run up the bending ears, the seams that run down the body, the trails of sheet metal that sprout from the bottom of the carrot or the letters around the nozzle on the reverse, there is an incredible range of textures at play. These are made all the more dramatic by the mercury-like perfection of the bulk of the surface which they disrupt and emphasize. Its curving, sloping surfaces reflect the viewer, yes, but also reflect itself. In this, entire games of light and movement are invoked, with aspects of the rabbit’s anatomy reflected in its head, in its torso and even in the carrot, creating a veritable hall of mirrors.

It is hard to underestimate the cultural impact of Rabbit—both on artists and critics, and the wider viewing public. When it was first shown at Ileana Sonnabend’s gallery in New York in 1986, the art critic of the New York Times, Roberta Smith, described this “oversize rabbit, with carrot, once made of inflatable plastic. In stainless steel, it provides a dazzling update on Brancusi’s perfect forms, even as it turns the hare into a space-invader of unknown origin” (R. Smith, “Art: 4 Young East Villagers at Sonnabend Gallery,” New York Times, 24 October 1986, reproduced online). The respected Museum of Modern Art curator Kirk Varnedoe would describe it as a milestone, recalling that he was “dumbstruck” when he first saw it at the Sonnabend exhibition (K. Varnedoe, “Milestones: 1986: Jeff Koons’s Rabbit,” ArtForum, Vol. 41, No. 8, April 2003, reproduced online at www.artforum.com). In 2000, Varnedoe curated Open Ends at MoMA, juxtaposing Rabbit with Brancusi’s own works. In 1987, the year after Rabbit was made, a cast was featured in the Saatchi Collection’s NY Art Now in London; Damien Hirst, then a young art student, would see it, later recalling, “I couldn’t get my head around its simple beauty at first; I was stunned, the bunny knocked my socks off” (D. Hirst, quoted in G. Wood, “The Wizard of Odd,” Observer, 3 June 2007, reproduced online at www.theguardian.com). And when Louise Lawler made the photograph Foreground in collectors Stefan Edlis and Gael Neeson’s home, it was the side view of the sidelined Rabbit that added to the pointedly understated visual drama, disrupting the Mondrian-esque geometry of the interior.

Kirk Varnedoe’s article in ArtForum, recalling his impression of the Rabbit when he saw it in 1986, exemplifies the incredible iconic intensity with which Koons managed to imbue his sculpture. Varnedoe runs through a catalogue of allusions and implications. After all, this faceless quicksilver rabbit manages to embody whole ranges of references while at the same time remaining deadpan and aloof. We find ourselves filling its steely silence with thoughts of Disney, Playboy, childhood, Easter, Brâncu?i, Lewis Carroll, Frank Capra’s Harvey, Marcel Duchamp’s readymades, Andy Warhol’s Clouds… The Rabbit manages to invoke all of the above, without ever plumping for a single meaning. “Look at the Rabbit,” Koons said to David Sylvester. “It has a carrot to its mouth. What is that? Is it a masturbator? Is it a politician making a proclamation? Is it the Playboy Bunny?… it’s all of them” (J. Koons, quoted in D. Sylvester, Interviews with American Artists, London, 2002, p. 342). If not for Rabbit, Koons said he would have called it The Great Masturbator after Salvador Dali’s painting. Rabbit is what the viewer brings to it. “I’ll be your mirror,” breathed Nico in the eponymous Velvet Underground track a couple of decades earlier, at the height of their collaboration with Warhol. “Reflect what you are, in case you don’t know… I find it hard to believe you don’t know / The beauty you are.” Rabbit echoes this sentiment: it is a hand—albeit an authoritative one—held out in support for the viewer. It tells us that life is good, that all tastes are acceptable, that we should be at one with ourselves. Gleaming like some luxurious futuristic idol, it is a mirror not for princes, but for the public, reflecting us, incorporating us within the ever-shifting drama that plays out on its surface. We are all embraced by this totem.

The success of Rabbit, more than any of the other works in the Statuary series that Koons had shown at the Sonnabend Gallery, is all the more impressive considering it was the only sculpture in the group that was almost not made. When, in the wake of his Luxury and Degradation show, Koons had been asked to contribute works for a group show alongside painters Ashley Bickerton, Peter Halley and Meyer Vaisman, he had been struck in a moment of inspiration and had sketched out—on a bar napkin—ideas for nine of the ten sculptures that would give an idea of the cross-section of society. There is Louis XIV at one end, Bob Hope at the other, with Cape Codder Troll and Doctor’s Delight in between. Yet for Rabbit, there is a rare note of indecision. “When I made my stainless steel rabbit, I really couldn’t decide whether to make an inflatable rabbit or an inflatable pig,” Koons explained to Norman Rosenthal. “I would stay up at night. I have drawings from around that time where I have written down, ‘Shall I do the rabbit or the pig?’ I would inflate the originals and look at them, and I couldn’t decide. ‘Shall I make the inflatable rabbit, or shall I make the inflatable pig? I like both.’ Economically, I could only make one of them at a time, and I chose the rabbit” (J. Koons, quoted in N. Rosenthal, Jeff Koons: Conversations with Norman Rosenthal, London, 2014, p. 135). The show was a hit, with the artists—dubbed ‘The Hot Four’—fêted in the press and in art world circles. Fueled in no small part by the positive reception of Rabbit, it was a springboard to Koons’s international recognition, which would reach new levels with his subsequent series, Banality—in which the jilted pig made its own resurgent appearance—and Made in Heaven.

In his recollection of the dilemma he endured, Koons mentions inflating the originals. In the case of Rabbit, this was a callback to his first ‘official’ series of works, the Inflatables of 1979. In this series, a group of inflatable toys were shown on plinths made of right-angled mirrors, most of them flowers. The mirrors were themselves inspired by Robert Smithson’s works. In Rabbit, Koons appears to have fused the DNA of the inflatable toy and its mirror support from 1979, creating a single sculpture. The shape has changed from the original one shown in Inflatable Flower and Bunny: its legs and torso are more bulbous, making it at once cuter—and more phallic. This emphasizes its links to the pared-back aesthetic of the revered Romanian sculptor, Constantin Brâncu?i, who would distill forms down to their barest essence. In his Male Torso, for instance, there is just the inverted Y form of three cylinders—a body and two legs; in Princess X,

the eponymous subject has been converted into what viewers and critics have repeatedly seen as an arcing penis and testicles—her head and breasts reduced to an incredible level of abstraction.

In truth, Koons has carefully worked to avoid accusations of over-abstraction in Rabbit. The wrinkles and creases of the inflatable original have been carefully crafted in steel, giving it a visceral link to the original object while instilling a heady sense of vulnerability. These ripples—themselves prefigured in the bronze version of Brancusi’s Princess X—create plays of light. Like the hanging strips of metal indicating the original plastic ‘leaves’ of the carrot in the bunny’s hand, they also serve as a covenant, inextricably linking Rabbit to its humble origin as a plastic blow-up toy. Thus, while serving as a textural counterpoint, adding a visual drama and dynamism to the ovoid and spherical forms that dominate the composition, they primarily function as minutely-observed details. In this way, Koons subtly insists that this is not a work of abstraction, but instead one of hyperrealism.

In this sense, the ephemeral nature of the inflatable has been transcended: transformed into stainless steel by artisans working to Koons’s famously-exacting specifications, Rabbit is nigh on indestructible. This is not an intimation of mortality: it is a refutation of it. The vulnerable plastic of the inflatable has been reinforced through Koons’s deft intervention. Stainless steel was a material to which Koons had turned in his previous series, Luxury and Degradation, creating works such as his Jim Beam – J.B. Turner Train, Pail and Baccarat Crystal Set. These were all objets trouvés—found objects—that were then transmogrified by being rendered in shiny steel.

Steel is at once a practical, even proletarian material—one with which Koons had long associations, having been raised in York, Pennsylvania, a small city which prospered in part because of the local steel industry. Crucially, as well as being strong and useful, stainless steel also has the gleam and glimmer of luxury. “I think the Bunny works because it performs exactly the way I intended it to,” Koons said of Rabbit. “It is a very seductive shiny material and the viewer looks at this and feels for the moment economically secure. It’s most like the gold- and silver-leafing in church during the baroque and the rococo. The bunny is working the same way. And it has a lunar aspect, because it reflects. It is not interested in you, even though at the same moment it is” (J. Koons, quoted in A. Haden-Guest, “Interview: Jeff Koons,” pp. 12-36, A. Muthesius (ed.), Jeff Koons, Cologne, 1992, p. 22). In this way, Rabbit and its fellow sculptures in Statuary paved the way for the aesthetic that would see Koons continue to evoke the visual theatrics of European church interiors in Banality and Made in Heaven.

Rabbit, then, ties into the general wave of reassurance that lies at the heart of many of Koons’s works. He has often pointed towards social mobility, sometimes commenting upon it, sometimes critiquing it, but always insisting that the viewers accept themselves for themselves. Thus, in Luxury and Degradation, the series that immediately preceded Statuary, he explored the mechanics of the alcohol industry and the way they tap into and manipulate people’s aspirations in order, ultimately, to peddle booze. It was in this series that Koons had first invoked stainless steel in his sculptures, hinting at both its democratic side, and the fact that it is not a precious metal, however utilitarian it may be. Earlier, in Equilibrium, Koons had explored the way that success in sports was explored and exploited as a vehicle for social change, especially in the African American community. Crucially, he was pointing out the irony both of the slender hope of salvation through basketball, and the fact that he himself, as an artist, was using these images as a rung in the ladder as he carried on in his own upward trajectory through the art world. This was the commodity culture of the contemporary art scene laid bare. Yet the suspended basketballs and the bronze Aqualung alike also acted as promises of support, of salvation.

Building on the success of its use in Luxury and Degradation, in Statuary, Koons explored to greater depths the ability of stainless steel to serve both as a leveler and as a deliberately flawed signifier of wealth. “Statuary presents a panoramic view of society,” Koons explained. “On the one side there is Louis XIV and on the other side there is Bob Hope. If you put art in the hands of a monarch, it will reflect his ego and eventually become decorative. If you put it in the hands of the masses, it will reflect mass ego and eventually become decorative. If you put art in the hands of Jeff Koons, it will reflect my ego and eventually become decorative” (J. Koons, quoted in H. Werner Holzwarth (ed.), Jeff Koons, Cologne, 2009, p. 224).

The various elements in Statuary occupy places across the strata of society and taste: from the inflatable toy of Rabbit to the old-school humor of Bob Hope to the extravagance and decadence of France’s ‘Sun King’ to the titillation of Doctor’s Delight, and so on… The objects range from treasures to gewgaws and everything in between. Koons ceased to use readymades in the series that followed, yet he continued to explore their aesthetic in his own works, creating confections which deliberately invoked kitsch in Banality and Made in Heaven. In the latter series, sculptures of flowers, cherubs and puppies were paired with others showing Koons making love to his then-wife in a series of lavishly explicit photographs, with some of their sex acts celebrated in three dimensions, on large scale, in materials such as polychrome wood, marble and glass. Koons was encouraging his viewers not to allow the structures and strictures of taste to keep them down, but to indulge their guilty pleasures, and indeed expunge any sense of guilt in the first place. As he has explained, “Art is a form of self-help that can instill a sense of confidence in the viewer” (J. Koons, quoted in R. Koolhaas & H.U. Obrist, “Interview,” pp. 61-84, Jeff Koons: Retrospective, exh.cat., Oslo, 2004, p. 61).

It is this self-help aspect that makes stainless steel such a perfect material for Rabbit and its fellow works. As Koons explained, “Polishing the metal lent it a desirous surface, but also one that gave affirmation to the viewer. And this is also the sexual part - it’s about affirming the viewer, telling him, ‘You exist!’ When you move, it moves. The reflection changes. If you don’t move, nothing happens. Everything depends on you, the viewer. And that’s why I work with it. It has nothing to do with narcissism” (Koons, quoted in I. Graw, “‘There Is No Art in It’: Isabelle Graw in Conversation with Jeff Koons,” pp. 75-83, M. Ulrich (ed.), Jeff Koons: The Painter, exh. cat., Frankfurt, 2012, p. 78). Rabbit, then, embraces the viewer in its reflective surface. Like the tree in the forest, it is activated by our presence.

As a sculpture, Rabbit is Koons’s avatar. It stands in for Koons specifically, and for the artist in general, a miniaturized authority figure on a plinth. Mute with its ‘mouthlessness,’ but with its ears firmly pointed towards us, Rabbit is a passive, responsive dictator, perfectly encapsulating the contradictions of the role of the artist that preoccupy and drive Koons himself. It is nonetheless powerfully eloquent, its carrot reminiscent of a microphone. As he explained to Matthew Collings only half a decade after Rabbit was created, Koons saw Rabbit as a symbol of “being a leader, an orator, the carrot to the mouth is a symbol of masturbation. I see Pop art as feeding people a dialogue that they can participate in. Instead of the artist being lost in this masturbative act of the subjective, the artist lets the public get lost in the act of masturbation” (J. Koons, quoted in M. Collings, “Jeff Koons Interviewed by Matthew Collings,” pp. 39-47, A. Papadakes (ed.), Pop Art Symposium, London, 1991, p. 42).

Rabbit stands out from the Statuary crowd, as it also prefigures what has since become one of Koons’s best-known and best-loved series of works: Celebration. Rabbit may only be three and a bit feet tall, but it is a clear ancestor of Balloon Dog, Balloon Flower and its sister-works—as well as the subsequent Balloon Rabbit of 2005-10. In this, it taps into one of the most recurrent themes in Koons’s work: the role of air or breath as a representation of life. Explaining this with reference to the pool toys so meticulously reproduced in painted for his series, Popeye, Koons stated, “When you take a deep breath, it’s a symbol of life and of optimism, and when you take your last breath, that last exhale is a symbol of death. If you see an inflatable deflated, it’s a symbol of death. These are the opposite” (J. Koons, quoted in J. Peyton-Jones & H.U. Obrist, “Jeff Koons in Conversation,” pp. 67- 75, Peyton-Jones, Obrist & K. Rattee (ed.), Jeff Koons: Popeye Series, exh. cat., London, 2009, p. 71). Be it in the early Inflatables, in the vacuum cleaners shown in his earlier series The New, in the bronze boats and diving equipment of Equilibrium or the balloons of Celebration, this invocation of breath has been a constant for Koons.

Rabbit, then, transcends its own limitations. It is a signifier that launches the viewer on an endless journey of association, tumbling down a rabbit hole of meaning. It neither confirms nor denies any of the conclusions that may be drawn. It is its ability to leave these ideas hanging that lends it the power that has seen it attain the status it enjoys today. It is approachable, sweet, high-brow, Pop; it is about sex and death and taste and class; it is about optimism and innocence and reproduction. It explores the role of the artist in the modern world, and our own place too. It reflects whatever we bring to it. In this, it reveals Koons’s own ability to create art works that launch a thousand thoughts. It is only too apt that the last time this version of Rabbit was shown in public, over three decades ago, it was in a show entitled The Sleep of Reason. This phrase was taken from one of Francisco Goya’s caprichos, showing a sleeping artist beset by a tumult of beastly chimeras. “The sleep of reason produces monsters,” an inscription on the picture declares. However, Goya’s own explanation is more in tune with Rabbit: “Fantasy, abandoned by reason, produces impossible monsters; united with it, she is the mother of the arts and the origin of marvels.”

Jeff Koons: A Masterpiece from the Collection of S.I. Newhouse

title

Rabbit

creator

Jeff Koons (b. 1955)

exhibited

New York, Sonnabend Gallery, Ashley Bickerton, Peter Halley, Jeff Koons, Meyer Vaisman, October-November 1986 (another example exhibited).

New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Whitney Biennial 1987, April-July 1987, pp. 71 and 208 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Paris, Galeries Contemporaines, Centre Georges Pompidou, Carte Blanches: Les Courtiers du Desir, April-May 1987 (another example exhibited).

London, Saatchi Collection, NY Art Now: The Saatchi Collection, September 1987 p. 139 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Museum Fridericianum Kassel, Schlaf der Vernunft, February-May 1988, pp. 115 and 223 (exhibited; another example illustrated in color).

Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art, Jeff Koons: Works 1978-1988, July-August 1988, p. 28, no. 21 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Newport Beach, Newport Harbor Art Museum, OBJECTives: The New Sculpture, April-June 1990, pp. 98-99 and 173 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Sydney, Art Gallery of New South Wales, 8th Biennale of Sydney: The Readymade Boomerang: Certain Relations in 20th Century Art, April-June 1990, p. 18, no. 235 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

New York, Museum of Modern Art; Art Institute of Chicago; Los Angeles, Museum of Contemporary Art, High and Low: Modern Art and Popular Culture, October 1990-September 1991, p. 368, no. 1 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Bonn, Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Territorum Artis, June-September 1992, pp. 171 and 380, no. 85 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum; ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum; Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Jeff Koons: Retrospektiv, November 1992-April 1993, p. 41 (Amsterdam and Stuttgart), p. 47, no. 31 (Aarhus) (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Minneapolis, Walker Art Center, Jeff Koons, December 1992-October 1993, pl. 31, no. 38 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Santa Monica, Eli Broad Family Foundation, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, December 1995-January 1996 (another example exhibited).

Santa Monica, Eli Broad Family Foundation, Group Show, December 1997-July 1999 (another example exhibited).

Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Washington D.C., Corcoran Gallery of Art; Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, Jasper Johns to Jeff Koons: Four Decades of Art from the Broad Collection, October 2001–October 2002, pp. 124-125 and 191 (another example exhibited, illustrated in color and illustrated in color on the cover).

Naples, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Jeff Koons, June-September 2003, p. 61 (another example exhibited and illustrated).

New York, C & M Arts, Jeff Koons: Highlights of 25 Years, April-June 2004, n.p., pl. 10 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Oslo, Astrup Fearnley Museum for Moderne Kunst; Helsinki City Art Museum, Jeff Koons: Retrospectiv, September 2004-April 2005, pp. 56-57 and 139 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art, Universal Experience: Art, Life, and the Tourist’s Eye, February-June 2005, p. 89 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art, Super Vision, September-December 2006, pp. 96-97 and 192 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Magritte and Contemporary Art: The Treachery of Images, November 2006-March 2007, p. 218 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Kunsthaus Bregenz, Re-Object: Marcel Duchamp, Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Gerhard Merz, February-May 2007, pp. 106, 115, 117 and 128 (another example exhibited, illustrated in color and installation view illustrated).

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Broad Contemporary Art Museum at LACMA, Inaugural Installation, February-September 2008, p. 246 (another example exhibited and installation view of another example illustrated in color).

Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art, Jeff Koons, May-September 2008, pp. 27, 50 and 55 (another example exhibited, illustrated in color and installation view illustrated).

Château de Versailles, Jeff Koons Versailles, September 2008-April 2009, pp. 37-39, 136 and 166 (another example exhibited, illustrated in color, installation views illustrated in color and illustrated in color on the cover).

London, Tate Modern; Hamburger Kunsthalle; Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada, POP Life: Art in a Material World, October 2009-September 2010, p. 8 (another example exhibited, illustrated in color and illustrated in color on the cover).

Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art, Without You I’m Nothing: Art and Its Audience, November 2010-May 2011 (another example exhibited).

Frankfurt, Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung, Jeff Koons. The Sculptor, June-September 2012, p. 43, no. 3 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art; Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art; Minneapolis, Walker Art Center, This Will Have Been: Art, Love, & Politics in the 1980's, November 2012-March 2013 (another example exhibited).

New York, Whitney Museum of American Art; Paris, Centre Georges Pompidou; Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, June 2014-September 2015, p. 87, 93, 96-98 and 117 (New York); pp. 95, 101,104-106, 125 (Paris) (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Los Angeles, The Broad, Inaugural Installation, September 2015-May 2016 (another example exhibited).

Kunstmuseum Basel, Sculpture on the Move 1946-2016, April-September 2016, p. 113 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art. Heaven and Earth: Alexander Calder and Jeff Koons, October 2017-April 2019 (another example exhibited).

Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art, We are Here, We are Everywhere, October 2017-January 2018 (another example exhibited).

Oxford, Ashmolean Museum, Jeff Koons at the Ashmolean, February-June 2019, p. 59 (another example exhibited and illustrated in color).

Mexico City, Museo Jumex Appearance Stripped Bare: Desire and Object in the Work of Marcel Duchamp and Jeff Koons, Even, June-September 2019 (another example to be exhibited).

literature

A. Wallach, “The New Art is SoHo Cool,” Newsday, October 1986, (another example illustrated in color).

K. Larson, “Masters of Hype,” New York, November 1986, p. 100 (another example illustrated).

R. Kleyn, “Nuovi Concetti,” January, 1987, p. 60 (another example illustrated).

F. Owen, “Neo-Geo,” i-D, February 1987, p. 90 (another example illustrated in color).

M. R. Rubenstein and D. Wiener, “Sites and Sights: Considerations on Walter de Maria, Jeff Koons, and Tom Butter,” Arts Magazine, March 1987 (another example illustrated).

L. Cooke, "Object Lessons: Just What Is It About Today's Sculpture...?," Artscribe, no. 65, September-October 1987, p. 55 (another example illustrated in color).

A. Schwartzman, “The Yippie-Yuppie Artist,” Manhattan Inc., December 1987, p. 139 (another example illustrated).

G. Politi, “Jeff Koons,” Flash Art, February-March 1987, p. 44 (Italian version; another example illustrated in color); p. 76 (English version; another example illustrated in color).

J. Saltz, "The Dark Side of the Rabbit: Notes on a Sculpture by Jeff Koons," Arts Magazine, February 1988, p. 27 (another example illustrated in color).

M. Sandford, “Kunstler, Sammler, Sensationen,” New York, May 1988, p. 108 (another example illustrated in color).

R. Smith, "Rituals of Consumption," Art in America, May 1988, p. 171 (another example illustrated in color).

Galeries Magazine, France, June-July 1988, pp. 112 and 117 (another example illustrated in color).

H. Tamaka, "Jeff Koons," Hi Fashion, no. 172, August 1988, p. 137 (another example illustrated in color).

New York in View, Ashley Bickerton, Jeff Koons, Allan McCollum, Haim Steinbach, Meyer Vaisman, exh. cat., Kunstverein Munchen, 1988, p. 13 (another example illustrated).

M. Cox, “Feeling Victimized? Then Strike Back: Become an Artist,” The Wall Street Journal, February 1989 (another example illustrated).

H. Hanson, "Art Works: Highbrow, High-Priced Tchotchkes" Chicago, February 1989, pp. 23-24.

M. Westenholm, “Scharlatan und Super-Star: Jeff Koons,” Pan, February 1989, p. 11 (another example illustrated in color).

K. Kertess, "BAD," Parkett, no. 19, March 1989, p. 43 (another example illustrated in color).

M. Compton, “Pop Art II – Jeff Koons & Co.,” Art & Design, July 1989, p. 38 (another example illustrated in color).

J. Hall, "Neo-Geo's Bachelor Artists" Art International, Winter 1989 (another example illustrated on the cover).

D. Kazanjian, “Koons Crazy,” Vogue, August 1990, p. 339 (another example illustrated in color).

N. Jenkins, "Kirk Varnedoe: High, Low, Hot and Cool," ARTnews, vol. 89, no. 8, October 1990, p. 165 (another example illustrated in color).

P. Plagens, "MoMA Takes the Low Road," Newsweek, October 1990, p. 72 (another example illustrated in color).

D. Barricklow, The Face, London, November 1990, p. 104 (another example illustrated in color).

K. Vandedoe and S. Ramljak, "With a Fine Disregard: An Interview with Kirk Varnedoe," Sculpture, November-December 1990, p. 19 (another example illustrated).

R. Enright, “The Material Boy and the Femme Fidele,” Border Crossings, Winter 1990, p. 40 (another example illustrated in color).

J. Lamoureux, Parachute Magazine, February 1991, p. 64 (another example illustrated).

T. Frend, “Ein Happening fur Gefule und Begierden,” New Magazine, July 1991, p. 38 (another example illustrated in color).

"Hommage An Armani Koons – Werk," Elle Germany, 1991, p. 178.

J. Albig, “Jeff Koons, ein Prophet der inneren Leere" Art, December 1992, p. 53 (another example illustrated).

J. Koons, The Jeff Koons Handbook, London, 1992, p. 83 (another example illustrated in color).

Men, 1992, p. 178 (another example illustrated in color).

A. Muthesius ed., Jeff Koons, Cologne, 1992, p. 89, no. 3 (another example illustrated in color).

B. Riemschneider, Jeff Koons: 30 Postcards, Cologne, 1992 (another example illustrated in color).

R. Hughes, “The Princeling of Kitsch,” Time Magazine, February 1993, p. 79 (another example illustrated).

D. Littlejohn, "Who As Jeff Koons And Why Are People Saying Such Bad Things About Him?" ARTnews, vol. 92, no. 4, April 1993 (another example illustrated in color on the cover).

H. Vater, “Kunst der Totalen Banalitat,” Das Magazine, April 1993.

"Kitsch as Koons Can," PRINZ magazine, May 1993, p. 145 (another example illustrated in color).

A. Haden-Guest, “A Collector’s Progress,” Art & Auction, December 1993, p. 80 (another example illustrated in color).

L. Morell, “Jeff Koons Interview: The Political Value of Art,” Skala: Nordic Magazine of Architecture and Art, no. 28, 1993, p. 38 (another example illustrated).

K. Varnedoe, New Acquisitions in MoMA, no. 17, Summer 1994, p. 17 (another example illustrated).

Z. L. Bozovic, ed., Razgovori O Likovnoj Umetnosti II, Belgrade, 1994, p. 66 (another example illustrated).

W. E. Solomon, "Koons: The Artist Matures" York Sunday News, 10 December 1995, pp. A7-A9.

K. Seward, "Frankenstein in Paradise," Parkett, no. 50-51, December 1997, p. 70 (another example illustrated in color).

The Age of Modernism—Art in the 20th Century, exh. cat., Berlin, Martin-Gropius-Bau, 1997, no. 335 (another example illustrated in color).

C. Iles and I. Sischy, Fascination: Hugo Boss, New York, 1998 (another example illustrated in color).

S. H. Madoff, “Creative Chaos,” Time Magazine, New York, November 1999, p. 98 (another example illustrated in color).

Artforum, vol. 38, no. 8, March 2000, p. 11 (another example illustrated in color).

Apocalypse: Beauty and Horror in Contemporary Art, exh. cat., London, Royal Academy of the Arts, September-December 2000, p. 232 (another example illustrated in color).

Hounds in Leash: The Dog in 18th and 19th Century Sculpture, London, 2000, p. 64.

Jeff Koons: Easyfun-Ethereal, exh. cat., Berlin, Deutsche Guggenheim, 2000, p. 35, no. 16 (another example illustrated in color).

M. Kemp, The Oxford History of Western Art, Oxford, 2000, pp. 504 and 524-525.

E. Lucie-Smith, American Realism, London, 2002, pp. 225-228.

Osaka University of Art: Basic Study of Three Dimensions Textbook, Japan, 2002, p. 173 (another example illustrated).

K. Siegel, “Jeff Koons Talks to Katy Siegel,” Artforum, March 2003, pp. 252-253 (another example illustrated in color on the cover).

K. Varnedoe, "Jeff Koons’ Rabbit,” Artforum, April 2003, p. 90 (another example illustrated in color).

“Letters to the Editor,” Artforum, Summer 2003, p. 18 (another example illustrated in color).

P. Karmel, “Man of His Words: Pepe Karmel on Kirk Varnedoe,” Artforum, November 2003, p. 26 (another example illustrated in color).

M. McKenzie, Images We Love: Popular Art in America, 2003, p. 47 (another example illustrated).

S. Freudenheim, “Romancing the Collector: Will There Be a Storybook Ending?” New York Times, 31 March 2004, p. F1 (another example illustrated).

“Contemporary Art.” Art + Auction, April 2004, 114-115, (another example illustrated).

V. Hatelmann, “Ik Beloof Je, Het Is Performatief,” Metropolis M, no. 4, August-September 2004, pp. 74-75.

"Matthew Barney vs. Jeff Koons," Blackbook, October-November 2004, pp. 82-87.

M. Higgs, "Best of 2004: 13 Critics and Curators Look at the Year in Art," Artforum, December 2004, p. 157 (another example illustrated in color and illustrated in color on the cover).

S. Dumont and K. E. Haug, “Jeff Koons Gets a Lift,” Carl’s Cars, no. 69, 2004, pp. 22-25.

S. K. Freedman, et al., Plop: Recent Projects of the Public Art Fund, New York, 2004, p. 131 (another example illustrated in color).

The BROAD Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2004, p. 13 (another example illustrated in color).

G. Politi, "Jeff Koons: An Interview by the Readers of Flash Art," Flash Art, vol. 38, no. 240, January-February 2005, p. 90 (another example illustrated in color).

G. McNatt, "Pop with No Apologies," The Baltimore Sun, 9 April 2005.

K. Johnson, “Eager Globe-Trotters Shrink the Art World,” New York Times, 29 April 2005.

K. D. Thomas, “The Selling of Jeff Koons,” Art News, vol. 104, no. 5, May 2005, p. 118 (another example illustrated in color).

R. Dickins, The Usborne Book of Art: A Complete Introduction for Beginners, London, 2005, p. 138 (another example illustrated).

“Agenda,” Amici, March 2006, p. 35 (another example illustrated).

C. Kaplan, "Koons & McCartney," Monopol Magazin, June-July 2006, p. 83 (another example illustrated in color).

K. Johnson, “The ‘Vision’ Thing: Inaugural ICA sets its sights on contemporary consciousness,” Boston Sunday Globe, 10 December 2006, pp. N18-19 (another example illustrated).

T. Buser, Experiencing Art Around Us, Australia, 2006, p. 476 (another example illustrated in color).

S. C. Canarutto, Jeff Koons (Supercontemporanea series), Milan, 2006, pp. 48-49 (another example illustrated in color).

J. Gasparina, I Love Fashion: L’art contemporain et la mode, Paris, 2006, p. 11.

K. Varnedoe, Pictures of Nothing: Abstract Art Since Pollock, Princeton, 2006, p. 40 (another example illustrated in color).

C. Dietrich, “Eben hineinstolpern ins Gluck,” Vorarlberger Nachrichten, 17 February 2007, p. D7 (another example illustrated).

A. Grabher, “Marcel Duchamp ist unser Grobvater. Bei Jeff Koons wird der Betrachter im Kunsthaus zum Readymade,” Auflagenstaarkste Tageszeitung Voralbergs, 17 February 2007, (another example illustrated).

B. Hainley, “Reviews: Magritte and Contemporary Art: The Treachery of Images” Artforum, February 2007, p. 301 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

T. McDonough, “Education of the Senses,” Art in America, March 2007, p. 127 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

D. Walsh, “Jeff Koons: On Track,” Art & Living, Issue 7, Summer 2007, pp. 42-46 (another example illustrated in color).

R. Smith, “A Bunny Balloon Sheds Its Steel Skin,” New York Times, 23 November 2007.

Art in America: Three Hundred Years of Innovation, exh. cat., Beijing, National Art Museum of China, 2007, p. 301, no. 112 (another example illustrated in color).

P. Tinari, “Some Simple Reflections on an Artist in a City, 2001-2007,” Parkett, no. 81, 2007, p. 115 (another example illustrated in color).

T. Von Wagner, "Generation Zeitgeist," Art, no. 1, January 2008, pp. 36-43 (another example illustrated on the cover).

F. Bonami, “Jeff Koons,” Panorama First, no. 4, 2008, p. 117 (another example illustrated).

C. Vogel, “A Colossal Private Sale By the Heirs of a Dealer,” New York Times, 12 May 2008.

P. Schjeldahl, “Funhouse: A Jeff Koons Retrospective” New Yorker, 9 June 2008, pp. 130-131.

H. W. Holzwarth, ed., Jeff Koons, 2008, pp. 46, 219-220, 230 and 238 (another example illustrated in color and installation view illustrated in color).

M. Nakamura, "USA: Jeff Koons," art actuel, no. 57, July-August 2008, p. 71 (another example illustrated in color).

MCA Magazine, Chicago, Summer 2008, p. 2 (another example illustrated in color).

"Koons Royal," Monopol Magazin, vol. 5, no. 37, September 2008, p. 28 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

S. Gassot, "Jeff Koons a Versailles: Provocation ou Revolution?" Paris Capitale, no. 134, September 2008, p. 56 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

J. Benhamou-Huet, "Exposition: Le roi du kitsch trone a Versailles," Le Point, 4 September 2008, p. 84 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

"Questions sur l'expositin Jeff Koons au chateau de Versailles" Le Monde, 8 September 2008, p. 1 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

V. DuPonchelle, "Toute la planete reunie a Versailles pour Jeff Koons," Le Figaro, 10 September 2008, p. 28 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

J. P. Frimbois, "Jeff Koons: son Pari a Versailles," art actuel, no. 58, September-October 2008, pp. 4 and 6 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

"Jeff Koons," Exporama, September-October 2008, p. 63 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

S. Lambert, "Jeff Koons," l'Officiel Hommes, Fall-Winter 2008, p. 106 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

U. Thon, "Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand," Art, October 2008, p. 42 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

M. Houellebecq, "Jeff Koons," Art World, issue 7, October-November 2008, p. 31 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

C. Mooney, "Jeff Koons: Chateau de Vaersailles," Art Review, no. 28, December 2008, p. 131 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

H. Bourdeaux-Martin, “Profile – Dominique Levy,” Whitewall, Winter 2008, p. 42 (another example illustrated in color and installation views illustrated).

A. Demir, "King Koons," BC/BE Contemporary, Winter 2008, pp. 40, and 110 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

V. Barton, “Jeff Koons,” Elle Decor, December 2008-January 2009, pp. 118-119 (another example illustrated in color).

C. Andrew, "Koons at Versailles," So Chic, 2008, p. 26 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

Jeff Koons. Celebration, exh. cat., Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, 2008, pp. 49 and 110, no. 12 (another example illustrated in color).

F. Bonami, “Art & Money,” Domus, March 2009, pp. 34-36 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

É. Troncy, “Jeff Koons, Château de Versailles, 10 Septembre-14 Décembre 2008,” Frog, Spring-Summer 2009, p. 40 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

“Listings: Tate Modern,” RA Magazine, no. 104, Autumn 2009, p. 63 (another example illustrated in color).

C. Jackson, "When Art Goes Pop," Wall Street Journal, October 2009 (another example illustrated).

“When It Come To the Crunch, This is Too Trite. Art: Pop Life,” City A.M., 8 October 2009, (another example illustrated in color).

A. M. Homes, "Popping Up: The Tate Modern's Graphic Exhibition," Vanity Fair, October 2009, p. 118 (another example illustrated in color).

G. O'Brien, "Andy Lives!" Departures, November-December 2009, p. 173 (another example illustrated in color).

C. Tan, “From Pop to Pop,” Business Times, Christmas 2009, pp. 10 and 18-22 (another example illustrated in color).

C. Bonham-Carter and D. Hodge, The Contemporary Art Book, London, 2009, p. 133 (another example illustrated in color).

J. Schellmann, ed., Forty are Better than One, New York, 2009, p. 193 (another example illustrated in color).

P. Ségalot and F. Giraud, The Impossible Collection: The 100 Most Coveted Artworks of the Modern Era, New York, 2009, no. 82 (another example illustrated in color).

M. Sollins, ed., art: 21, Massachusetts, 2009, p. 95 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

F. Bonami, Dal Partenone Al Panettone, Milan, 2010, p. 137 (another example illustrated in color).

L. Saxberg, “Explicit Erotic Art Confined to Restricted Section in National Gallery Show,” Canwest News Service, April 2010, (another example illustrated).

N. N. Holland, “Jeff Koons’ ‘Rabbit,’ the Brain, and Postmodern Art,” Psychology Today, June 2010 (another example illustrated).

P. Simpson, “Jeff Koons,” The Ottawa Citizen, June 2010 (another example illustrated).

P. Richter, “I?Jeff Koons ,“ BMW Magazine, Autumn 2010, p. 50 (another example illustrated in color).

E. Granjean, “L’art contemporain, le nouveau luxe d’aujourd’hui” Edelweiss Hors Serié Luxe, November 2010, p. 22 (another example illustrated in color).

Childish Things, exh. cat., Edinburgh, Fruitmarket Gallery, 2010, p. 9 (another example illustrated In color).

A. Tölke, “Gleichgewicht Der Kräfte,” Build, March 2011 (another example illustrated in color on the cover).

C. Bruck, "Broad's Way," Monopol Magazin, April 2011, p. 50 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

P. Nicolin, “So Different, So Appealing,” Kaleidoscope, New York., Summer 2011, pp. 134-135 (another example illustrated in color).

B. Finger and C. Weidemann, 50 Contemporary Artists You Should Know, New York, 2011, p. 68 (another example illustrated in color).

P. Javault, "Le Bon Exemple: Jeff Koons," 20/27, no. 5, 2011, p. 126 (another example illustrated in color).

K. Johnson, Are You Experienced?: How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art, New York, 2011, p. 195 (another example illustrated in color).

J. Reckhenrich, M. Kupp and J. Anderson, “Made in heaven – produced on earth: creative leadership as art of projection,” Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34, no. 4, 2011, p. 18 (another example illustrated in black and white).

“Pop Chart,” Time Magazine, January 2012 (another example illustrated in color).

S. Elsing, "Eine Ausstellung über Götter und Gummitiere," Welt, 19 June 2012.

G. Curreri, “Art, Love and Politics in the ‘80s: An exhibition at the ICA,” The Daily Free Press, November 2012 (another example illustrated in color).

I. Lefort, “Jeff Koons: Un Américain à Beaubourg,” La Tribune et Moi, December 2012 (another example illustrated in color).

E. Broad, The Art of Being Unreasonable: Lessons in Unconventional Thinking, Hoboken, 2012, (another example illustrated in color on the cover).

Jeff Koons, exh. cat., Basel, Fondation Beyeler, 2012, pp. 22 and 178, no. 7 and 9 (another example illustrated in color).

H. U. Obrist, The Conversation Series 22: Jeff Koons, Cologne, 2012, p. 115 (another example illustrated).

S. Phillips, …isms, New York, 2012, p. 125 (another example illustrated in color and on the cover).

“U.S. Giant Jeff Koons,” Harper’s Bazaar China, 2012 (another example illustrated in color).

C. Swanson, “Jeff Koons is the Most Successful American Artist Since Warhol, So What’s the Art World Got Against the Guy?” New York Magazine, May 2013, p. 28 (another example illustrated in color).

M. Hollein, “100 Meisterwerke,” Monopol Magazin, December 2013, p. 51 (another example illustrated in color).

“Art That Goes Pop,” Kempinski, 2013, p. 26 (another example illustrated in color).

L. Lowe, “Jeff Koons, in His Own Words,” Architectural Digest, June-July 2014, p. 57 (another example illustrated in color).

R. Lacayo, “Show me the Bunny: As he Closes in on 60, Jeff Koons Finally Gets His Really Big Show,” Time Magazine, June-July 2014, p. 93 (another example illustrated in color).

N. Liucci-Goutnikov, “Jeff Koons: Une Histoire de Goût,” Les Cahiers du Musée National D’Art Moderne, Summer 2014, p. 49 (another example illustrated).

S. Watson, “Jeff Koons at the Whitney,” Huffington Post, August 2014 (another example illustrated in color).

M. Fujimori, “Jeff Koons,” ArtTecho, October 2014, p. 33 (another example illustrated in color).

J. Lavrador, “Jeff Koons: génie ou imposteur?” Beaux Arts Editions, no. 365, November 2014, p. 136 (another example illustrated in color).

J. Wullschlager, “Jeff Koons at the Pompidou: Inflated out of all proportion,” Financial Times, November 2014 (another example illustrated in color).

L. Blissett, “Sept moments-clefs dans une vie d’artiste,” Beaux Arts editions, December 2014, p. 12 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

C. Moltisanto, “Koons et l’histoire de l’art,” Beaux Arts editions, December 2014, p. 62.

A. Romanacce, “Jeff Koons: Le Roi Midas,” Arts Magazine, December 2014, p. 112.

R. Wolff, “Singular Sensations,” Art Basel Miami Beach, December 2014, p. 244.

H. Debailleux, “Jeff Koons: Faiseur d’icônes,” L’Oeil Magazine, December 2014, p. 10 (another example illustrated in color).

The Other Side: Mirrors and Reflections in Contemporary Art, exh. cat., Vienna, Belvedere, 2014, p. 128 (another example illustrated in color).

I. Sischy, “Jeff Koons: L’Art Gonflé,” Vanity Fair, 2014, p. 142 (another example illustrated in color).

S. Thornton, 33 Artists in 3 Acts, New York, 2014, p. 76 (another example illustrated in color).

Sculpture After Sculpture: Fritsch/Koons/Ray, exh. cat., Stockholm, Moderna Museet, 2014, pp. 73 and 75 (another example illustrated in color and installation view illustrated).

J. Koons and N. Rosenthal, Jeff Koons: Conversations with Norman Rosenthal, London, 2014. p. 133 (another example illustrated in color).

S. Sherwin, “Forget ‘Look, but don’t touch.’ For a new generation of children and artists alike, play’s definitely the thing,” W: Art, May 2015, p. 38 (another example illustrated in color).

G. Gassmann, “Jeff Koons’s Suggestions for What to See, Read and Do This Summer,” New York Times Style Magazine, July 2015 (another example illustrated in color).

A. Sokoloff, “Jeff Koons,” Ars Magazine, vol. 8, no. 27, July-September 2015, p. 38 (another example illustrated in color).

K. Novak, “Spin Dazzle: Decades of Art in a Daze,” Harper’s Bazaar Hong Kong, September 2015 (another example illustrated in color).

K. Stakemeier, Texte Zur Kunst, no. 99, September 2015, p. 218 (another example illustrated in color).

S. Yotka, “Jeff Koons’s Iconic ‘Rabbit’ Now Comes in Jewelry Form,” Vogue, October 2015 (another example illustrated in color).

D. Dewitte, R. Larmann and M. Shields, Gateways to Art, New York, 2015, p. 133 (another example illustrated).

J. Heyler ed., The Broad Collection, New York, 2015, pp. 10, 21, 84 and 86 (another example illustrated in color).

H. W. Holzwarth ed., Jeff Koons, Slovakia, 2015, pp. 8, 40-41 and 93 (another example illustrated in color and installation view illustrated in color).

Art + NYC: A Complete Guide to New York City Art and Artists, New York, 2016. p. 94.

“Das Readymade: Die beste Idee der Kunstgeschichte,” Art das Kunstmagazin, March 2016, p. 39 (another example illustrated in color).

I. Viturro, “Jeff Koons presentó su Ballerina en el Mala,” Vanidades, April 2016 (another example illustrated in color).

“Sculpture on the Move 1946-2016, Kunstmuseum Basel,” Gagosian Quarterly, May-August 2016, p. 140 (another example illustrated in color).

H. Pfortmüller, "Lust - Kunst, Kunst - Lust" L'Officiel Schweiz, 2016, p. 108.

Robert Rauschenberg, exh. cat., New York, Museum of Modern Art, 2016, p. 327 (another example illustrated in color).

C. Yu, Ravenel, no. 20, Spring 2017 (another example illustrated in color).

S. Michaelsen, “Jeff Koons,” Volkskrant Magazine, May 2017, p. 18 (another example illustrated in color).

J. L. Roberts, ed., Terra Foundation Essays: Scale, Chicago, 2017 (another example illustrated in color).

R. Storr, Interviews on Art. London, 2017, p. 389 (another example illustrated in color).

Vom Sinn der Kunst, Kunstforum, May 2018 (another example illustrated in color).

Gagosian Quarterly, Fall 2018, p. 133 (another example illustrated in color).

J. Belcove, “Private Museums Established by Wealthy Collectors are On the Rise,” Robb Report, 18 November 2018 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

Dan Colen: Mailorder, Mother, Purgatory, exh. cat., New York, Le´vy Gorvy, 2018, p. 67 (another example illustrated in color).

“Jeff Koons art on display at Ashmolean Oxford,” BBC News, 7 February 2019 (another example illustrated in color).

W. Gompertz, “Will Gompertz reviews Jeff Koons at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford,” BBC News, 9 February 2019 (another example illustrated in color).

L. Cumming, “Jeff Koons at the Ashmolean review - a master of deflection,” The Guardian, 10 February 2019 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

T. Hughes, “Jeff Koons Shines at Ashmolean Museum Oxford,” The Oxford Times, 14 February 2019 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

M. Westall, “Jeff Koons heads to university,” FAD Magazine, 15 February 2019 (installation view of another example illustrated in color).

lot_number

15 B

provenance

Sonnabend Gallery, New York

Private collection, New York

Gagosian Gallery, New York

Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1992


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  • Visualizza tutti gli oggetti di Altro
  • Visualizza tutti gli oggetti in Altro
*Nota: il prezzo non corrisponde al valore odierno, ma si riferisce soltanto al reale prezzo di aggiudicazione al momento dell'acquisto.


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