Oggetti "Adam's"

Oisin Kelly RHA (1915-1981)

Oisin Kelly RHA (1915-1981), Kilcorban Madonna, Terracotta, 62cm high (24½''), Sculptor Oisín Kelly (1915-81) is best known for his large public bronzes, such as, Two Working Men, at the County Hall, Cork (1969), The Children of Lir, at the Garden of Remembrance, Parnell Square, Dublin (1971), Jim Larkin, in O, Connell Street, Dublin (1977), and, The Chariot of Life, at the Irish Life Centre, Dublin (1982). But he also made a great many smaller pieces, in various media. Many of these deal with devotional themes, and his religious works are to be seen in churches throughout the country. The statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary with the Infant Christ illustrated here has an interesting history. Oisín was greatly influenced by medieval Irish art, and this piece was inspired by the Kilcorban Madonna, an oak carving which dates from around the year 1200. It is currently on display in the Clonfert Diocesan Museum, Co. Galway. Oisín was commissioned by the Reverend Thomas Hogan to carve a similar piece for the restored Ballintubber Abbey, Co. Mayo, and it was completed in 1966. It was often his practice to treat the same theme in different media, and he decided to make this stoneware version of the statue, of which six copies were kiln-fired. During boyhood visits to the Conamara Gaeltacht, Oisín developed a love for traditional Irish céilí dancing. From the beginning of his career as a sculptor he was fascinated by the challenge of convincingly representing céilí dancers in movement. One of his earliest works was a male dancer in stained wood, and he also modelled a popular, Dancing Couple, which was included in the Kilkenny Design Workshops ceramic range. Another lively piece comprises a group of three dancers, carved in wood. The bronze figure illustrated here is one of an issue of seven: it is a smaller version of, Dancing Girl, on permanent display at Fitzgerald Park, Cork. Fergus S. Kelly, (Son of Oisín Kelly, and author of, The Life and Work of Oisín Kelly, , with photography by Hugh McElveen, Derreen Books, 2015)Leggi di più

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Patrick Scott HRHA (1921-2014)

Patrick Scott HRHA (1921-2014), Silver Painting (10/90), Tempera and silver leaf on canvas, 122 x 122cm (48 x 48''), Signed and inscribed verso, Provenance: The collection of Brian and Anne Friel, Patrick Scott began his trademark Silver and Gold paintings on unprimed canvas as long ago as the early 1970s. The great orbs in silver or gold emerged from similar painted forms that were assumed to refer to the sun and the moon. This was especially the case when planet earth seemed to be threatened by destruction through nuclear activity following the bombings at the end of World War II, and in Ireland, proposals to build a nuclear reactor in County Wexford. Scott though, despite a consistent interest in the environment, was even more psychically connected to the basic forms of circles, squares, cubes and combinations of these architectural and geometric elements. Self-taught as a painter, his professional training was in architecture and design and led straight to an appointment in the offices of Michael Scott and Robin Walker, where his design skills were immediately put to effective and varied use in projects such as Bus Aras, theatre designs for the Abbey Theatre, uniforms for Coras Iompar Eireann, and Christmas lighting for Grafton Street. Scott was an idealist. His art has been dedicated to the sublime and the elemental, the perfect geometric forms that he, like Plato, believed to lie beneath every aspect of our world. For Scott, that also meant the materials used to embody those forms. Looking to the Italians of the Early Renaissance on the one hand and Japanese Zen design on the other, he magicked landscapes out of elemental forms, using real gold, silver or palladium leaf which he attached to pure, unprimed canvases so firmly that he could take the garden hose to them without damaging their glittering surfaces. Silver painting 10/90, was made in 1990, the same year in which he painted, Sun Window, and, Moon Window, . All three share the same square format, the same dimensions and the simple combination of an orb hovering seductively above an architectural element. Everything is in its proper place. Nothing remains to be said. Scott won numerous awards during his long career, was elected Saoi of Aosdana and his work can be found in all Irish major collections as well as in the Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, the European Parliament, Strasbourg, the Mitsubishi Bank, Tokyo and many national and international private and corporate collections. Catherine Marshall, August 2018Leggi di più

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Patrick Pye RHA (1929-2018)

Patrick Pye RHA (1929-2018), Abraham's Sacrifice, Triptych, oil and pastel on card, 48cm x 82cm (19 x 32¼''), Dated 1988, Patrick Pye was not raised in a religious household, however he developed a strong sense of faith and converted to Catholicism in his thirties. Patrick Pye was a talented artist from a young age and he drew great inspiration from the religious paintings of El Greco, being drawn to his dramatic and expressionistic style. In 1957, Pye won the Mainie Jellett Scholarship, a stipend that allowed him to travel Europe and, in particular, to visit the National Museum of Barcelona where he was further inspired by its collection of Romanesque Catalan art. From here, much of Pye, s artistic output was dictated by Christian iconography and many of his pieces now hang in religious institutions. Abraham, s Sacrifice, is typical of Pye, s spiritual works, using art to bring his faith into the physical spectrum. In his own words, Pye wished, to open the doors of perception so that the outer world is seen united with its spiritual meaning. Here, Pye breaks down a complex narrative into bold blocks of colour and presents us with the Old Testament story of Abraham and Isaac. Having been ordered by God to sacrifice his son, Abraham is bent over Isaac with his knife raised. In pathetic fallacy, the day has grown dark, with the tumultuous sky raging above. To the left, the shadow continues, with an ominous cross extending towards the viewer to guide their line of vision to rest on the tragic form of the pieta. The two scenes complement each other, urging the viewer to draw parallels between the two stories and to reminisce on God, s ultimate sacrifice for his people. In stark contrast, the right-hand panel completes the narrative on a more joyous note. The bright blue sky is interrupted only by the rainbow, a symbol acting as a reminder of God, s covenant with man. A sacrificial ram is presented to Abraham to take the place of his son as a sign of God, s mercy, the purity of its white coat being reflected in the angel, s robes above. This panel, though not the focus of the work, is instrumental to the piece at it converts the image to one of optimism and hope. Helena Carlyle, August 2018Leggi di più

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Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012), Image of James Joyce (Opus 424), Oil on canvas, 70 x 70cm (27½ x 27½''), Signed verso and dated (19)'79-88, Provenance: With Galerie Jeanne Bucher, Paris; Taylor Galleries, Dublin, where purchased by current owner. In Dorothy Walker's monograph on the artist le Brocquy she describes the spiritual and technical problems with his images of Joyce. ''It is said that no Dubliner can quite escape from the microcosmic world of Dublin, and in this I am certainly no exception. James Joyce is the apotheosis, the archetype of our kind and it seems to me than in him-behind the volatile arrangement of his features-lies his unique evocation of that small city, large as life and therefore poignant everywhere. But to a Dublin man, peering at Joyce, a particular nostalgia is added to the universal ''epiphany'', and this perhaps enables me to grope for something of my own experience within the ever-changing landscape of his face, within the various and contradictory photographs of his head which surround me, within my bronze death-mask of him and, I suppose, within the recesses of my own mind. Indeed I think that this preoccupation of mine is not altogether unlike that of the Celts of prehistory, with their oracular cult of the human head, the mysterious box which holds the spirit prisoner. To attempt today a portrait, a single static image of a great artist such as Joyce, appears to me to be futile as well as impertinent. Long conditioned by photography, the cinema and psychology, we now perceive the human individual as facetted, kinetic. And so I have tried as objectively as possible to draw from the depths of paper or canvas these changing and even contradictory traces of the man. In this fragmentary search I have seemed at times to encroach on archaeological ground. Is there archaeology of the spirit? Certainly neither my will nor my skill has played any essential part in these studies. For the fact is that many of them emerged entirely under my ignorant left hand-my right hand being for some months immobilized in plaster. So it would appear that no dexterity whatever was involved in forming these images, which tended to emerge automatically, so to speak, jerked into coherence by a series of scrutinized accidents, impelled by my curiosity to discover something of the man and, within him, the inverted mirror-room of my own experience."Leggi di più

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Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957), The Sandwich Board Man, Pen, ink and watercolour on paper, 21 x 32cm (8¼ x 12½''), Signed, Provenance: A gift directly from the artist to his nurse and thence by decent. In Yeats, s drawing an old man carries a sandwich board across his shoulders. It bears a placard advertising a cinema. The man pauses to fill his pipe with tobacco. He stands near the Dublin quays, on D, Olier Street, just south of O, Connell Bridge. The O, Connell Monument and Nelson, s Column are visible behind his right shoulder. This was a favourite part of the city for Yeats. A number of his oil paintings such as, Crossing the City, , (1929, Private Collection), and, The Street in Shadow, (1925, Private Collection) focus on this central location. The more famous, Bachelor, s Walk, In Memory, (1915, on loan to National Gallery of Ireland) and, The Liffey Swim, (1923, National Gallery of Ireland) both depict sites just the other side of the quays to this view. A well-dressed man and woman, gazing into a shop window, stand close behind the figure. Across the street the end of a tram can be seen with a man standing on its platform. Beyond this pedestrians hurry along the pavement. Amidst this scene of a busy crowd, the sandwich-board man appears both aloof and solitary. He is a type of outsider figure that was much admired by Yeats and central in his work. The artist was fascinated by the nomadic existence of such figures, whose livelihood was uncertain and arduous. While outsiders were usually ballad singers or travelling nomads in the landscape, the sandwich-board man offers an urban alternative. He calls to mind the drifting carriers of the H. E. L.Y.S. sign in James Joyce, s, Ulysses, whom Bloom encounters at several points on his crossings of Dublin. Yeats was keenly aware of the world of advertising, noting down unusual or witty by-lines, slogans and signage in his sketchbooks. He had worked briefly for the famous billboard company, David Allen and Sons, in Manchester in 1892. Hilary Pyle notes that when sandwich boards were used to advertise Yeats, s exhibitions in Dublin in the early 1900s, the artist coloured the placards himself. (1), The image is constructed in black ink with touches of pale colour applied afterwards. The cross hatchings evoke the lines of woodblock prints or engravings and impart a primitive quality, suggesting the authenticity and simplicity of the scene. The finer and looser use of black line used in the left hand side of the composition suggests falling rain or fading light. The surface of the road is made to appear damp through the use of a cold blue colour and widely spaced strong vertical lines juxtaposed by looser thinner lines. The complex use of line in the face of the sandwich-board man conveys his character sympathetically, an elderly man engaged in filling his pipe and temporarily removed in a psychological sense from his surroundings. Róisín Kennedy, August 2018, 1) Hilary Pyle, Jack B. Yeats. A Biography, , Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1970, p.47Leggi di più

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Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980)

Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980), Sunflowers, Algarve Coast, Oil on board, 56 x 71cm (22 x 28''), Signed, In the summer of 1961 Norah McGuinness stayed in the Algarve where she produced several paintings. Six of these were included in her successful solo exhibition staged at the Dawson Gallery that autumn. This work is similar to other Portuguese landscapes, such as, In the Algarve, (1961, Private Collection), and dates to this time. According to a contemporary account, the artist found the soaring temperatures in Portugal so extreme that she cut short her stay to return to the cool of her studio in the Dublin Mountains. (1), This colourful work takes in a panoramic view of the Portuguese coastline dominated by a castellated hilltop town with whitewashed walls in the distance. To its left the Sierra is made of strange conical mountains. In the foreground a peasant woman, wearing traditional black and a large hat, carries a basket. The figure emphasises the timeworn nature of everyday life in Portugal, confirming a touristic idea of the country as remote and untouched by modernity. By contrast, below on the yellow sands of a cliff lined beach, the tiny figures of sun-bathers and holidaymakers are visible. The dried out form of a large sunflower dominates the left-hand foreground. The motif, which McGuinness also uses in, In the Algarve, , denotes the overwhelming power of the sun, as does the burnt orange of the scorched terrain in which it grows. McGuinness, s combination of strong oranges and yellows and the deep blues of the sea and sky impart a sense of the exotic beauty of the Algarve. As in her views of Ireland, the artist applies a cubist inspired lens to the composition. The paint is applied in small rectangular patches and subtle repetition of geometric forms articulates the landscape. Róisín Kennedy, August 2018, 1), Irishwoman, s Diary, , Irish Times, , 10 November 1961, p.10Leggi di più

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James Arthur O'Connor (1792-1841)

James Arthur O'Connor (1792-1841), View in Castle Coote Demesne, Oil on canvas, 63.4 x 76cm (25 x 29¾''), Signed and dated 1840, Exhibited: Dublin 1872, Exhibition of Arts, Industries and Manufacturies, No.1678; Dublin 1941, James Arthur O'Connor Centenary Exhibition; Dublin 1985, National Gallery of Ireland, James Arthur O'Connor, Catalogue No.87. Literature: John Hutchinson, James Arthur O'Connor, NGI 1985, p.190, b&w illustration. James Arthur O, Connor was born in Dublin, the son of an engraver and printer, William O, Connor. Although given a few lessons by Dublin artist William Sadler, he was largely self-taught. A lifelong friend of George Petrie and Francis Danby, he went to London with them in 1813, only to return a short time later to look after his orphaned sisters. His reputation as an artist quickly developed while back in Ireland, painting a series of landscapes for the Marquis of Sligo and Lord Clanricarde. In 1821 O, Connor and his wife, Anastatia, emigrated to London and the following year he exhibited at the Royal Academy. Over the course of the next decade he travelled a great deal in Europe, visiting France, Belgium, Holland and Germany, spending several months in the Rhine Valley. With his eyesight and his general health failing in 1839, his output diminished dramatically and he eventually died, virtually penniless, in London in 1841. John Hutchinson noted, in the catalogue for a retrospective exhibition in the National Gallery of Ireland in 1985, that O'Connor's work may be divided into three distinctive phases - early topographical paintings, mid-period picturesque and late romantic. In his late period, the principal source of inspiration was the Italian painter Salvator Rosa, and from around 1830 until the end of his career, O'Connor tended to paint landscapes of dramatic intensity in which rock outcrops, darkly brooding skies and windblown trees are the main features. The present work, A View in Castlecoote Demesne, which fits perfectly to this description and is, according to Thomas Bodkin in his 1920, Four Irish Landscape Painters, , perhaps the artist, s final painting. He describes the painting:, The tone of the picture is golden brown: there is a faint touch of blue in the sky. It is painted in a vigorous, easy style, with good impasto. He further says that, in all probability, the picture was done for Captain (later Colonel) Chidley Coote, of Huntington, Queens County, his most consistent and generous patron. In summing up O, Connor, s contribution to late 18, th, and 19, century Irish landscape painting, John Hutchinson states, Ǫbecause O, s romantic paintings depend for their effect on the observer, s acceptance of them as naturalistic, which, by and large, they are, it is more difficult to distance oneself from them, or to treat them, like Danby, s later work, as fantasy or escapism. In their own way, O, s romantic images can speak to us as vitally now as they did to his contemporaries. Therein, I think, lies their significance. Moreover, they justify John Berger, s assertion that the history of landscape painting is a movement from direct description to self-expression, from either topography or emblematisation to, landscapes of the mind, . In O, s work can be seen the progression of the eighteenth to the nineteenth century; his, portraits of houses, are thoroughly conditioned by his patrons, expectations, his picturesque views are idealized, but the romantic paintings provide us with surprisingly direct access both to the artist, s times and to a genuinely personal perception of life,Leggi di più

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Sir John Lavery RA RSA RHA (1856-1941)

Sir John Lavery RA RSA RHA (1856-1941), Mrs. J.F. McGuire - a Half Length Portrait Wearing a Black Dress, Lace Shawl and Pearls, Oil on canvas, 76.2 x 63.5cm (30 x 25''), Signed, Provenance: The McGuire Family, U.S.A.; The Closson Galleries, Cincinnati, Ohio. Exhibited: 1926, New York, Duveen Galleries, 'American Portraits, Interiors and Landscapes by Sir John Lavery', November 29th - December 11th 1926, Catalogue No.21. A copy of the Duveen catalogue is available to the purchaser, together with two typed letters, dated March and December 1926, from John Francis McGuire to Mrs. Lloyd H. Fales (Harriette), in which reference is made to Sir John Lavery and the portraits done by him of the McGuire women - Mrs. J.F. McGuire and Miss Julia McGuire. This portrait, although not the first of Lavery, s to be exhibited in America, bore the fruits of that initial visit in 1925 which led to him making connections with wealthy American families such as the McGuires. As the letter, accompanying this lot illustrates, Lavery painted both Mrs J. F McGuire and her daughter Julia during this first trip. The family appeared to mix quite readily within the artistic milieu of the time entertaining Lavery on his return to the States in 1926, along with writer Captain Osbert Sitwell, painter Richard Wyndham and French art dealer Viscount A, lendcourt. Lavery is renowned for his society and political portraits. These works in many ways served both the artist and sitter in their outward expression of wealth and status achieved by both in the very act of commissioning the paintings. Mrs J.F McGuire, is depicted in half-length, looking out directly at the viewer, she has a strong confident presence that was often found in Lavery, s high society portraits. Though clothed in a fairly modest black dress, placing her against a stark background allows Lavery to pick out the delicate details of her floral patterned silk shawl and the lustrous highlights of her string of pearls. Her position in society was secure, and her formidable gaze, holding the attention of the viewer, leaves us in no doubt. Despite its modest size, Lavery first exhibition in America in November 1925 was a great success. He took up residence at the Ambassador Hotel overlooking Central Park. It was in this suite that he painted many of his commissions, a number of portrait interiors and fifteen portraits of American businessmen and their wives, presumably including this present example of Mrs J F McGuire. These works would go on to make up the basis of the second exhibition in the winter of 1926. There were 28 paintings included in this show, also housed in the Duveen Gallery with a mixture of interior scenes loaned by Mrs Alexander Hamilton Rice and Mr Harold I Pratt. There were two views of Central Park, morning and evening, and the remainder a collection made up of portraits of wealthy americans, including both the McGuire women, s portraits. A series of commissions in New York and Boston, secured due to his first exhibition, kept Lavery busy throughout in the winter. He and Hazel did not return home for Christmas but instead headed to the sunshine of Palm Springs in Florida. Lavery was keenly aware of the social cachet afforded to him by these visits to America. It was a very different place to Europe in the mid-1920s, where opportunities abound for the person who was astute enough to recognise it. This period is unusual in straddling two defining moments of that decade, the immediate aftermath of the first world war and the lead up to the Wall Street Crash. The art world existed within a very particular social and political environment. Lavery, s strong connections to the U.S, was largely orchestrated by the British art dealer, Joseph Duveen whose gallery housed Lavery, s first show across the Atlantic in 1925. Duveen had made his name in the modern art world by recognizing the opportunity that existed between the wealth, on two accounts, of art in Europe and money in the America. He was a staunch promoter of British art overseas and works that he introduced to the market became the basis for numerous museum collections across the country. Duveen had already played the important role in selling to self-made industrialists on the notion that buying art was also buying upper-class status. In the same way that commissioning artists such as Lavery to paint your portrait was a way of expressing that upper-class status for those who had massive fortunes but lacked the legacy that traditional landowning families had by virtue of their lineage. Niamh Corcoran, BA, August 2018Leggi di più

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